Thursday, August 10, 2017

The Return by Suzanne Woods Fisher

The Return


Beautiful and winsome, Betsy Zook never questioned her family's rigid expectations, nor those of devoted Hans--but then she never had to. Not until the night she's taken captive in a surprise Indian raid. Facing brutality and hardship, Betsy finds herself torn between her pious upbringing and the feelings she's developing for a native man who encourages her to see God in all circumstances. 

Greatly anguished by Betsy's captivity, Hans turns to Tessa Bauer for comfort. She responds eagerly, overlooking troubling signs of Hans's hunger for revenge. But if Betsy is ever restored to the Amish, will things between Hans and Tessa have gone too far? 

Inspired by true events, this deeply layered novel gives a glimpse into the tumultuous days of prerevolutionary Pennsylvania through the eyes of two young, determined, and faith-filled women.
(excerpt from back of book)


I am not a natural fan of  Amish fiction. That's why it takes a very special author to draw  me back into that world. Suzanne Woods  Fisher is just such an author and The Return is the latest of her books to bring me in.

One of the things I appreciate most about Fisher's books  is her characters. Without fail she brings forward characters  with hopes, dreams, and emotions  that  transcend the genre and are simply human. In The Return she offers multiple characters, most  notably Tessa and Betsy. I really enjoyed Tessa's character and I have a feeling Fisher remembers that age well as she  writes it with such accuracy.  Tessa's hopes and dreams regarding  Hans, her  envy of Betsy, her own wrestling with her own maturing made for great  reading and held the story solidly together.

Betsy also shone in both in her own way  as she wrestled through grief and forgiveness as well  as  a contrast to both Tessa and Hans. While I found Tessa more engaging it's Betsy that  begs reflection and shows her strength in that manner.

The plot was also interesting. I appreciated Fisher's use of Bairn to advocate for both the settlers and the aboriginals in the story.  While I am unfamiliar with the events the story was based around, Fisher includes lots of fun details including the Conestoga wagons and horses as well as people  like Benjamin Franklin helped anchor the story within its setting helping and richness and depth to the events. I love  when a story adds enough history to inspire me to do further research and I've definitely been inspired to read up on the real life accounts.

Overall, Fisher has brought another solid book that serves to add to its series or act as an enjoyable stand alone.
4 out 5  stars

"Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc."